Difference between revisions of "Nijo Castle (Tochigi)"

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|City=Tochigi
 
|City=Tochigi
 
|Prefecture=Tochigi Prefecture
 
|Prefecture=Tochigi Prefecture
|Notes=First of all, this site is severely overgrown. Even in winter the weeds were over my head in some areas but it was still a very interesting and exciting castle to visit. As you climb through the weeds you can find some very large trenches. The structure is basically one big main bailey with high steep sides and then some smaller side baileys and trenches around the base. The main bailey is pretty obvious once you see it but there is no trail going to the top. I just picked a spot that looked relatively easy and scaled the side with my trekking pole and gloves. The main bailey is amazing. It's quite large and there is a mostly in tact embankment that encircles it.  The original embankment was also fortified with stone walls which have mostly crumbled  by now but you can still find some places with nice stonework remaining.  
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|Notes=First of all, this site is severely overgrown. Even in winter the weeds were over my head in some areas but it was still a fascinating castle to visit. As you climb through the weeds you can find some very large trenches. The structure is basically one big main bailey with high steep sides and then some smaller side baileys and trenches around the base. The main bailey is pretty obvious once you see it but there is no trail going to the top. I just picked a spot that looked relatively easy and scaled the side with my trekking pole and gloves. The main bailey is amazing. It's quite large and encircled by a mostly in tact embankment.  The original embankment was also fortified with stone walls which have mostly crumbled  by now but you can still find some places with nice stonework remaining.  
  
Secondly, this castle is moderately difficult to fine, but hopefully my description at photos (see those at the end) will help future explorers. If you visit Nijo Castle, it is likely to be as a side trip from [[Nishikata Castle]]. On Google Maps it looks like you should be able to get there from [[Nishikata Castle]], but I could find no such comments on other blogs and when I was at Nishikata Castle, I couldn't be sure where to go to possibly reach Nijo Castle. Regardless, it may have been too overgrown or treacherous to get to anyway. You need to return to the main road (that the bus travels) from [[Nishikata Castle]], go a few blocks south (~10 mins) until you find a sign for Kaizan Fudoson (開山不動尊) and just follow this sign to the temple. Off to the side of the temple you'll see a trench with a little white wooden sign for 二条城 (Nijo-jo) this is the entrance to the castle. See photos below.   
+
Secondly, this castle is moderately difficult to find, but hopefully my description and photos (see those at the end and the map locations) will help future explorers. If you visit Nijo Castle, it is likely to be as a side trip from [[Nishikata Castle]]. On Google Maps it looks like you should be able to get there from [[Nishikata Castle]] through the woods, but I could find no such comments on other blogs and when I was at Nishikata Castle, I couldn't be sure where to go to possibly reach Nijo Castle. Regardless, it may have been too overgrown or treacherous to get to anyway. You need to return to the main road (with the bus stop) from [[Nishikata Castle]], go a few blocks south (~10 mins) until you find a sign for Kaizan Fudoson (開山不動尊) and just follow this sign to the temple. Off to the side of the temple you'll see a trench with a little white wooden sign for 二条城 (Nijo-jo) this is the entrance to the castle. See photos below.   
  
 
Once I got back to the station, I ran into a fellow castle explorer who asked where I disappeared to after Nishikata Castle (he saw me at both [[Manago Castle]] and [[Nishikata Castle]]). Apparently he could not find Nijo-jo. Also, when I posted my photos to Twitter I got other people asking for directions too so it's  understandably difficult to find. Part of the problem comes from the tunnel under the highway which looks like it's closed off, but there are some cinder blocks there for you to climb over the fence (at least I think that's what they're for). There were several wild boar traps on the other side so I assume the fence is just to keep the animals out of town.  
 
Once I got back to the station, I ran into a fellow castle explorer who asked where I disappeared to after Nishikata Castle (he saw me at both [[Manago Castle]] and [[Nishikata Castle]]). Apparently he could not find Nijo-jo. Also, when I posted my photos to Twitter I got other people asking for directions too so it's  understandably difficult to find. Part of the problem comes from the tunnel under the highway which looks like it's closed off, but there are some cinder blocks there for you to climb over the fence (at least I think that's what they're for). There were several wild boar traps on the other side so I assume the fence is just to keep the animals out of town.  
  
 
I have seen some recent Twitter posts that they've significantly cleaned up the site recently so I would really like to go again before it's weeded over.
 
I have seen some recent Twitter posts that they've significantly cleaned up the site recently so I would really like to go again before it's weeded over.
|History=Fujita Nobuyoshi was formerly a vassal of Uesugi Kagekatsu, but was expelled by Naoe Kanetsugu because of his close relationship with Tokugawa Ieyasu. Fujita fled to the Tokugawa  due to the good relationship between Tokugawa and Fujita. Fujita fled to Edo and after the Battle of Sekigahara, Tokigawa Hidetada awarded him lands and established the Nishikata domain. Fujita built this new Nijo Castle near [[Nishikata Castle]]. Fujita was demoted for his failures during the Summer Campaigns in Osaka in 1615. The Nishikata Domain was abolished and the castle was abandoned, coming to a quick and decisive end.
+
|History=Fujita Nobuyoshi was formerly a vassal of Uesugi Kagekatsu, but was expelled by Naoe Kanetsugu because of his close relationship with Tokugawa Ieyasu and fled to Edo. After the Battle of Sekigahara, Tokugawa Hidetada awarded him lands and established the Nishikata domain. Fujita built this new Nijo Castle near the [[Nishikata Castle]] remains. Fujita was later demoted for his failures during the Summer Campaigns in Osaka in 1615. The Nishikata Domain was abolished and the castle was abandoned, coming to a quick end.
  
 
The castle was also known as Nishikata Jin'ya. Some descriptions say that even before Fujita established this castle for the Nishikata Domain that Nijo Castle existed as a satellite fortification of Nishikata Castle. The name Nijo Castle (二条城), likely comes from the original name of Niijo Castle (新城) aka, "New Castle", but over time the long "i" was shortened and morphed into the same name as the more famous ([[Nijo Castle]]) due to to the similarity in name.
 
The castle was also known as Nishikata Jin'ya. Some descriptions say that even before Fujita established this castle for the Nishikata Domain that Nijo Castle existed as a satellite fortification of Nishikata Castle. The name Nijo Castle (二条城), likely comes from the original name of Niijo Castle (新城) aka, "New Castle", but over time the long "i" was shortened and morphed into the same name as the more famous ([[Nijo Castle]]) due to to the similarity in name.

Latest revision as of 21:30, 23 May 2020

Nijojo27.jpg

History

Fujita Nobuyoshi was formerly a vassal of Uesugi Kagekatsu, but was expelled by Naoe Kanetsugu because of his close relationship with Tokugawa Ieyasu and fled to Edo. After the Battle of Sekigahara, Tokugawa Hidetada awarded him lands and established the Nishikata domain. Fujita built this new Nijo Castle near the Nishikata Castle remains. Fujita was later demoted for his failures during the Summer Campaigns in Osaka in 1615. The Nishikata Domain was abolished and the castle was abandoned, coming to a quick end.

The castle was also known as Nishikata Jin'ya. Some descriptions say that even before Fujita established this castle for the Nishikata Domain that Nijo Castle existed as a satellite fortification of Nishikata Castle. The name Nijo Castle (二条城), likely comes from the original name of Niijo Castle (新城) aka, "New Castle", but over time the long "i" was shortened and morphed into the same name as the more famous (Nijo Castle) due to to the similarity in name.

Visit Notes

First of all, this site is severely overgrown. Even in winter the weeds were over my head in some areas but it was still a fascinating castle to visit. As you climb through the weeds you can find some very large trenches. The structure is basically one big main bailey with high steep sides and then some smaller side baileys and trenches around the base. The main bailey is pretty obvious once you see it but there is no trail going to the top. I just picked a spot that looked relatively easy and scaled the side with my trekking pole and gloves. The main bailey is amazing. It's quite large and encircled by a mostly in tact embankment. The original embankment was also fortified with stone walls which have mostly crumbled by now but you can still find some places with nice stonework remaining.

Secondly, this castle is moderately difficult to find, but hopefully my description and photos (see those at the end and the map locations) will help future explorers. If you visit Nijo Castle, it is likely to be as a side trip from Nishikata Castle. On Google Maps it looks like you should be able to get there from Nishikata Castle through the woods, but I could find no such comments on other blogs and when I was at Nishikata Castle, I couldn't be sure where to go to possibly reach Nijo Castle. Regardless, it may have been too overgrown or treacherous to get to anyway. You need to return to the main road (with the bus stop) from Nishikata Castle, go a few blocks south (~10 mins) until you find a sign for Kaizan Fudoson (開山不動尊) and just follow this sign to the temple. Off to the side of the temple you'll see a trench with a little white wooden sign for 二条城 (Nijo-jo) this is the entrance to the castle. See photos below.

Once I got back to the station, I ran into a fellow castle explorer who asked where I disappeared to after Nishikata Castle (he saw me at both Manago Castle and Nishikata Castle). Apparently he could not find Nijo-jo. Also, when I posted my photos to Twitter I got other people asking for directions too so it's understandably difficult to find. Part of the problem comes from the tunnel under the highway which looks like it's closed off, but there are some cinder blocks there for you to climb over the fence (at least I think that's what they're for). There were several wild boar traps on the other side so I assume the fence is just to keep the animals out of town.

I have seen some recent Twitter posts that they've significantly cleaned up the site recently so I would really like to go again before it's weeded over.

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Castle Profile
English Name Nijo Castle (Tochigi)
Japanese Name 二条城
Alternate Names Nishikata Jin'ya, Nii-jo
Founder Fujita Nobuyoshi
Year Founded 1601
Castle Type Mountaintop
Castle Condition Ruins only
Designations
Historical Period Pre Edo Period
Features trenches, stone walls
Visitor Information
Access Tobu Kanasaki Sta (Tobu Nikko Line), 30 mins walk
Visitor Information mountain, open 24/7
Time Required 60 mins
Location Tochigi, Tochigi Prefecture
Coordinates 36° 28' 16.68" N, 139° 43' 34.90" E
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Admin
Year Visited 2019
Contributor Eric
Visits March 17, 2019
Added to Jcastle 2020


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